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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)
the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
: last year's hurricane irene was the most recent storm to pummel the northeast. it cost the industry roughly $4.3 billion in insured losses. analysts can't yet predict how steep losses from sandy will be, but they say the companies with the most exposure include: liberty mutual, travelers, allstate, and chubb. auden thinks those firms will be able to shoulder a financial hit if the storm's damage mirrors that of irene. >> with every event companies gather more information on potential losses, so catastrophe losses become much more sophisticated. companies use those to measure aggregation of losses and potential losses from a given event. >> reporter: damage from wind, falling trees, and rain coming through roofs is covered by standard insurance policies. but analysts fear much of the damage from sandy to homes and businesses is likely to come from storm surge flooding which isn't. the insurance information institute estimates roughly 300,000 homes in the northeast could be vulnerable to this type of event. but the institute is optimistic many homeowners have flood insurance. >> nothi
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
of the restaurant here. he was telling us that basically it was highest he had ever seen. he was here for irene last year. he has been with the restaurant for about a decade here at battery gardens. saying again it was the most water he had ever seen come up. he seas if it gets to be the 11-foot level, melissa, that will be trouble. he will predicts that will go above the two levels of terrace he has and begin to seep into his restaurant there. back to you. melissa: wow, robert gray, down at battery, normally one of the most beautiful places in manhattan at the very southern tip. thanks so much for that report. >>> the storm expected to hit an area responsible for 6.5% of the country's refining capacity. does that mean gas prices are about a spike? stock exchanges shuttered today and tomorrow. what will happen when trading starts again? price futures group senior market analyst phil flynn has been following all the stories for us. i want to ask you, philings because you're at cme. s&p futures will open about an hour from now. investor sentiment pent up because markets closed today and tomorrow. what
unprecedented proportions. to put things in perspective. hurricane irene which you can see her on the right caused nearly $16 billion in damage and take a look at sandy in comparison. with sandy expected to linger over the northeast for days one can only imagine if the difference in size will reflect the difference in damage. we'll have the latest on the storm track and its strength in one minute. rick? >> reporter: the winds have picked up even more from last hour. steady now in the 40s and 50s with gusts but feel like over 0 miles per hour. i can't even read the wind gauge or turn into the rain because rain and sand is pelting us it many pretty painful. we are just after low tide. so the surf i'll it's rough is not encroaching on the boardwalk at this point and ocean avenue is still relatively dry. but other roads in the community are under water and many other roads across the state of new jersey are hazardous. the garden state parkway has been closed from exit 63 south to cape may. that's a major highway in new jersey shut down because of flooding in both directions. in fact atlantic ci
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
, former dnc chair and vermont governor howard dean is facing off against ed conard. irene rosenfeld, the ceo of mondolez international. the markets aren't to be forgotten. at 8:30 eastern time, we will be joined by jim grant. we're going to talk about the best investing strategies for the rest of the year with him. first, let's get you up to speed on this morning's headlines. over to andrew. >>> friday we'll get the government september jobs report. could be a game changer for the election. we'll get a hint of what may be to come. the employment report coming at 8:15 eastern time. poll forecasters say the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the compan
across the new york airports. with this one in particular, a little bit different from hurricane irene and the high tide and the flooding in the search that is going on. we are keenly interested in whether the airports will be at flood stage. that is a real possibility with this one. neil: what happens? is it done in the order of flights that were canceled immediately? if you were among those who had a flight canceled yesterday, you were first up to get your flight back off the tarmac today or tomorrow? how does it work? >> the best analogy is a thousand piece jigsaw puzzle that gets thrown in the middle of the table. trying to put back together as fast as you can, but there is a lot of systems that goes into that. this one is unique because it's not just the weather disruption, but also a system disruption to us because we really evacuated 60 aircraft out of the northeast all the way from washington to boston. neil: where did you bring him? obviously want them out of harms way. >> absolutely. we have some in the midwest. the first order is to get the fleet left where it belongs. then
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
.6 foot rise. that's going to bring the water because i remember i was here with irene, it was up to the top of these benches. now you're talking about water that's going to be about this high. so i think it's without question that we're going to flood the battery here. how much of this water gets in the subway system, i don't know. >> what about the wind? >> a lot of reports suggest -- what was that? >> are we going to see something like you see in kansas where you see roofs blown over after acres and acres of property. are we going to see that kind of wind damage in the northeast this time? >> reporter: don't think of what i'm getting here is representative of the wind because it's really not. i'm protected from the buildings. but we have gusts already out at montauk at 71. this is not like where you're going to have 130-mile-per-hour winds, so, no, the answer to that question is no, but there will be so much tree damage we think across interior pennsylvania and new york and new jersey, even parts of new england, back down through west virginia that that's a big concern. i mean,
irene, which hit last august in the same area. but by any measure, this storm, seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet. all of that water coming on and those high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here, unfortunately. >> all right. mark mancuso, from accuweather. thanks for joining us this morning, mark. >>> straight ahead, more of our continuing coverage of sandy. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy. and what the red cross is doing to help out. >>> plus, more incredible video from across the storm zone, including rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy? 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. >>> welcome back, everyone. 5 million people take the new york city subways every day. and this morning, the entire system is shut down. seven subway tunnels under the east river are flooded. and the electricity that pow
seen it. worse than irene. this is a frustrating situation to him. it has all to do with underground infrastructure. i shouldn't say only because that would be a record breaking storm surge. we had one that was higher than that. that's the main reason that it will take so long. >> some of those areas deliberately shut down power out of precaution. explain what happened. >> it is convenient because you don't have wires aboveground. but during a flooding situation that can spell big problems and it did. so they will shut down some of the stations as a precautionary measure and saeal them off so they don't get the corrosive salt water in there. they judged it on the past historic storms and built it higher than that. that's exactly what sandy brought them. so an unprecedented event and something that really they didn't plan for. i asked them are you going to look into upgrading that? that would cost serious dollars but he did acknowledge, that's a question that certainly has to be discussed. >> i know you have spoken with a lot of new yorkers. how are they reacting? especially the lower
a blustery, nasty day. >> before this made landfall, this storm seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer resea
through that we might know? >> exactly. it was very similar to hurricane irene last summer where the winds expanded several hundred miles out from the center of the storm. in a typical hurricane, most of the strong winds are near the core of the hurricane. in this case, obviously the strong winds were hundreds and hundreds of miles out from the center. that is very similar to hurricane irene last year. >> greta: do you fly straight through it? i imagine it's a rough ride and when you get to the eye of the storm it's calm. is that not what happens? >> well, we fly at 10,000 feet, and the idea is to go right through the center of the hurricane so you can measure the core of the storm, and then also measure the winds on the periphery of the storm, so it normally gets very rough right near the center and then typically out away from the center when the winds lighten up, it's not so bad any more, and in this case, for hurricane irene, at least on friday, the strong winds were well out from the center, and we had some really nasty stuff to go through on the north side of the storm, probably 105,
riesgos sobre todo luego del mal rato monumental causado por el huracÁn irene el aÑo pasado. estamos otro mando precauciÓn que esperan de nosotros. lo que es seguro no es un fin de semana para actividades al aire libre. para lo demÁs tenemos que esperar. sandy y su contraparte sin nombre se exportan en forma errÁtica y cualquier cosa puede suceder. si lo que ocurre es la tormenta perfecta la fecha estarÍa prÓxima. >>> a partir del domingo hacia el lunes pudiera estar comenzando a ocurrir la funciÓn y una tormenta que afectarÍa hasta el miÉrcoles. >>> siguen de cerca la posibilidad de un hecho que podrÍa ser histÓrico comparado con hace 20 aÑos tenemos muchos mÁs datos. conocimientos de la atmÓsfera. podemos aprender mucho de este tipo de fenÓmeno. >>> ina metereologÍa una bomba atmosfÉrica. en miami florida, lourdes del rÍo univisiÓn. barack obama es el primer presidente en la historia votar en el perÍodo de votaciÓn anticipada. una visita relÁmpago a ciudad de chicago. votara antes del 6 de noviembre en estas elecciones, pero como foso informa viviana avila no estÁ
than irene's 15.8 billion, last year. but far below katrina's 108-billion dollars and 18-hundred deaths and missing in 2005. unless there is damage to infrastructure, economists say ports and rail yards will make up for lost business quickly. some stock trades, perhaps not--because a light week was expected pending the outcome of the presidential race, a week from now. among insurers, allstate, travelers and chubb corp have the largest market share in sandy's path. corelogic, estimates it includes 284,000 homes worth $88-billion dollars. economists are mixed on whether the storm's impact will affect fourth- quarter g-d-p. mark vitner, senior economist with wells fargo securities says it depends how much is shut down and for how long. mark zandi at moody's analytics says the storm may cause spikes in economic activity--repairing and rebuilding. depsite the storm-- the government is expected to report unemployment numbers for october this friday. phone companies along the east coast are preparing for the likelihood of overtaxed communication infrastructure during hurricane sandy. at&t is
, running between $10 billion and $20 billion, according to eqecat. hurricane irene did $10 billion damage 14 months ago. >> susie: wall street was closed again today for the second straight day because of hurricane sandy. this is the first two-day weather-lateshutdown since 1888. but the major exchanges are expected to reopen tomorrow. all systems are a go. the new york stock exchange said the opening bell will ring as usual at 9:30 a.m. eastern time. the nasdaq will also open for normal operations on wednesday. that's just what investors wanted to hear. both exchanges have been running tests today to make sure all systems were running smoothly. >> susie: the nyse's building is located on wall street, just blocks away from the section of lower manhattan that was deluged by hurricane sandy. but there was no flooding at the big board, and no other damage to the building, trading floor and trading systems. but while the nyse and nasdaq expect tomorrow to be business as usual, it won't be a typical day for people trying to get to work. many of new york's bridges and tunnels are stil closed nd
on the boardwalk. many people have heeded the warnings. they are remembering what happened with irene last year. other people are saying, you know, we have been through the storms before. we are hunkering down and we are not leaking. of course, our fingers are crossed for them. connell: along the shoreline, for better or worse with a large group of people. dagen: breaking news on the water moving into new york city and manhattan our sister station is reporting that parts of fdr drive, this is one of the two main arteries in and out of new york city that runs along the edge of manhattan. on the east side of manhattan is fdr drive, that is now underwater according to fox five. fdr drive is on the east side of manhattan. this is a critical artery of moving traffic in and out of new york city. at 2:00 p.m. eastern time, both the holland and brooklyn battery tunnel will be closing. if people are not in the city or out of the city in a matter of hours, you will not have a choice. you will have to stay right where you are. dagen: if you went up the right side of the horseshoe there, the east river is
or new england. we will fine tune the forecast but still we are talking, remember last year with irene, this could be impacts from irene as we head to tuesday with sandy in the northeast. we will keep you updated here on the weather channel and weather.com can. every weekday morning at 6:00 a.m. get the latest with "wake up with al." 5-hour energy?onade 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer research and access to care. mike's being healthy and chewing like a man. introducing one-a-day vitacraves for men! it's a gummy multivitamin... with more vitamin b, to convert food to energy, and help mike do manly things, like wrestle bears and take out the garbage. new one-a-day vitacraves for men. >>> have you ever thought to yourself, man, i would lo
to compare it to would be eirene. i was here in new york for irene last year. this is much much worse than irene. much larger storm. not necessarily a stronger storm but because it is so large it has this tremendous amount of energy with it. all of that energy can do quite a bit of damage. when the sun comes up today we are going to get a good idea as to the real full extent of what actually happened over the past 24-hours. >>> that is for sure. this has been so large up and down the east coast. it has been as far west as chicago with 20-foot waves in lake michigan. >> all day and all night you have been sending us the pictures of the storm. >> i live in long island on the north shore of long island. you have been hearing about that. look at all of the downed trees this is in my house alone. last half this is before everybody went to bed last night we had lost 5 trees. these are 100 foot tall or hire trees. a lot of people have been sending us in their photos and videos. this is also on the long island sound. things are a real mess out there. heather childers joins us with a look at some o
storms in 1878 and 1903 and then hurricane irene became a tropical storm when it hit just last year. now, hurricane irene caused roughly $15 billion in damage all across the northeast. the state of new jersey alone got $275 million in federal assistance most going to homeowners and flooding private insurers. here in cape may, commercial fishing is the big business. a billion dollars in revenue for new jersey. further up atlantic city of course we know all of those casinos, 12 flagship institutions across the boardwalk are closed and halloween parties canceled. atlantic city is lower lying. that will be a very, very big hit. the place to watch. evacuated yesterday by 4:00 p.m. and chris christie declaring a state of emergency there because of how bad conditions are supposed to get there. it's only 9:00 a.m. right now. you can see how bad it's getting. the waves are spilling up into the dunes and there is flooding in the street. there's structural damage just a couple blocks away that we'll check out. definitely a strengthening storm here on the shore of new jersey. carl? >> kayla, thank y
for this outdoor reporting. >> been bringing us great updates. >> she dade great job too last year with irene. i think she was in north carolina. >> anyway, we'll check back in with kayla later this morning. let's also take a look at the markets. the futures are indicated higher after all the concerns that have been out there. the s&p futures up by more than 9.5 points. the dow futures are up by 65 points. not a lot of news stories that have been coming through. you've heard some earnings here and there. yesterday we had ford out early with better than expected numbers early. and there are a few other stories that have been out there, too. you guys see the ubs story? >> 10,000 jobs. >> 10,000 jobs this they were laying off. a lot of people found out when they showed up for work in london and their cards didn't work. other people found out because their e-mail kept bouncing back. that's the worst situation i've ever heard. it's not going to get nearly enough attention because of all the other things that are happening out there. >> did you see the other big merger yesterday? disney and "star wars
of the power outages. that is twice the number of houses impacted by hurricane irene last year. at least 18 deaths reported in seven states. for a little more perspective, how about this? one in six people are without power in new york, pennsylvania and new jersey. in new jersey we find ron, a spokesperson for new jersey power and light. what are you dealing with right now? >> we're dealing with outages to more than 930,000 customers. that is a significant portion of the 1.1 million customers we serve throughout the state. jenna: we saw that explosion at the substation. it was a big dramatic moment that affected power in the city of manhattan. did you have something similar out in new jersey? what caused the power outages? >> we did not have something similar to that we took some of the substations in barrier island communities and coastal communities off-line for safety reasons last night. our biggest concern is damage to our transmission lines of the we've started our assessment process and the winds will cooperate a little bit today we'll get helicopters up in the air to do an aerial ass
. >> that is true. what happened is we had a combination of hurricane irene and hurricane lee. that happened in 1955 with tremendous amounts of water build up. but in this case, it is the storm surge that did the dirty work because the way turned into the coast. again, i want to stress to people that heat and drought and hurricanes along the eastern seaboard are something we will have to deal with for the next several years because of the overall pattern. cooling pacific very warm and women. then we will be back to where we were in the 60s and 70s again. dagen: left hook of the storm, the ride home untransformed hitting us in new york city. if anything, on the jersey shore, that is different than hurricane irene when we saw it. >> that is exactly right. the hurricane is pushing a hand of water up through. in the 1938 hurricane, it doesn't bring a whole heck of a lot. from the storm passed to the left, it does. 15 feet of water in providence, rhode island. imagine that. 3800 of an inch of rain. less than connecticut, all through the delaware valley, tremendous flooding going on there. the same type o
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
from hurricane irene last year are -- taking these warnings very seriously this time around. further inland they're bracing for the possibility of heavy snow in west virginia, pennsylvania, and as far inland in fact, as ohio. there is a large swath of the country that need to keep an eye on this thing. not just the coastal areas. as far inland as ohio. >> huge ramifications on halloween, dubbing it frankenstorm. >>> trying to predict where the storm is going to go next. all different patterns. >> we don't know 100%. accuweather meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the latest. jim. >> good morning, rob, paula. here its hurricane sandy, a large storm system, center of circulation moving its way northwest out of the, out of the bahamas. will continue to hug the coast of florida here. not making direct landfall. on florida. but still lashing the coast, with some heavy rain through the day, today, through the weekend, hug the coast of the carolinas. makes a turn more to the north-northeast. flooding rainfall potentially. outer banks, north carolina. coastal south carolina
hurricane irene in 2011. this year, you look at june 2012, you had the colorado wildfire. you had hurricane isaac which hit louisiana. what we're looking at with sandy is multiple states across some of the most heavily populated states on the east coast, and that's why this has caught everybody's attention for good reason. >> susie: what about businesses? to what extent are they covered through all of this, or is ther a deference being a homeowner-- we have heard companies have closed operations for the next few days. >> well business insurance policy coverage is comparable to a home insurance policy, they're going to cover you for wind damage. most business insurance policies have a provegz in them called bi, or business interruption coverage. so if their property is hit directly and it causes them to shut down for a period of time, oftentimes they can file a claim and be covered for the business they could have potentially had, had there not been a hurricane that hit teir property. >> susie: everybody is hoping the storm goes out to sea and doesn't do much damage. thanks a lot. mike berry
. the mayor here wants to make sure people don't get complacent, basis year ago, hurricane irene, they had all these dire warnings, and it really didn't do much to this city. he wants to make sure they understand that this time there really could be some severe flooding, a storm surge of 4-eight of 8 feet which would mean where i'm standing will certainly be underwater. he's warning people in the low-lying parts of the island to prepare to evacuate. he said power could be out for days. they need a disaster supply kit. it's very important that people don't get complacent based on what happened a year ago because this one could be much worse. bob. >> schieffer: all right, thank you, my friend. chip reid in maryland. let's go now to cbs news correspondent elaine quijano. she is at point pleasant beach, new jersey this morning. elaine, what's the latest there? >> reporter: good morning to you, bob. well, governor chris christie has declared a statement of emergency here in new jersey, and he's also ordered the mandatory evacuation for residents who live on the barrier islands. that begin at 4:00 t
was boarded up. the second time it's been shut down. first being last year in the lead up to hurricane irene. >> i need to go to port authority and i need to catch a bus. >> went down here to get her back on the train and i don't think -- i don't know are the buses running? >> reporter: for many new yorkers sunday was a day to prepare for the storm or get out of town. >> we were called several times by our building management company and told we had to evacuate, so we're off. >> reporter: and classes at all public schools today have been cancelled and dozens of schools have been turned into shelters. all broadway shows for tonight have been cancelled. >> the conditions out there are expected to get worse throughout the morning. what's it like out there right now? >> reporter: well right now we're seeing some wind. we are next to the water so this is normally a windy area. we're seeing winds starting to pick up just a little bit. a tiny bit of drizzle. nothing compared to what we're expecting later today. >> thanks. hurricane sandy is affecting the race for the white house as well. early voti
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)

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